Common problems

Our main challenge is to find solutions for the most common problems that flowers and potted plants face in their journey from grower to consumer. We want to share our knowledge to help you avoid these problems.

If there is one flower species known to want to rise above all, it’s the tulip. Tulipa grow about 10 cm after cutting, during transport and whilst in the vase depending on the cultivar. Sometimes gerberas, anemone and antirrhinums also want to grow when cut and put in vases. Florists cannot do much to prevent this, growers can. Most tulips...
Stems carry the flower and give the flower access to water. The stem should remain undamaged to enjoy the flowers as long as possible. Do not remove bark or thorns from the stem. Did you know that stem scrapers and thorn removers belong to the top 10 list of torture treatments for flowers? Effects of stem scraping Scraping damages the...
Botrytis cinerea (grey mould) is a fungus which causes a loss of quality in flowers like Rosa, Chrysanthemum, Gerbera and Lisianthus. The place of origin, season, hygiene during processing and storage, weather conditions and climate control play an important role in the appearance and development of Botrytis. The fungus thrives on both living and dead plant materials. The infection starts...
Premature harvesting is the core problem of bent-neck in roses. The stem right under the bud is not strong enough to carry the weight of the growing bud/flower. When the stem bends in this way, the vascular bundles are pinched shut and the flower’s water supply is cut off. The leaves, on the other hand, remain healthy. Premature harvesting also...
Stem discolouration has a number of causes that may or may not be negative. Of course, no amount of stem discolouration looks attractive in a glass vase and the flower will be viewed as old. There are various causes for stem discolouration: Low pH: the optimum pH level of the vase water is between pH 3.5 and 5.5. If soft...
Leaf yellowing is a sign of insufficient natural plant growth hormones, regulating the production of leaf green in the leaf. Before being cut, the mother plant took care of the production of these hormones. After cutting there is a shortage of these substances due to interrupted ‘juice flow’ from the mother plant. Leaf yellow is nothing other than loss of...
Leaf burning is a complex phenomenon and is the result of burst leaf cells. A significant cause of rupturing of cell walls is an excessive osmotic effect of the cell content and therefore an excessively strong water influx. The leaf finally discolours from grey to brown and feels dry and crunchy to the touch. Extraneous substances from other flowers/branches in...
This well-known phenomenon is the premature wilting of the flowers that are sensitive to vascular blockages, such as Rosa, Bouvardia, Chrysanthemum and Gerbera. Post-harvest phase Harvest the flowers at the appropriate level of maturity Cut at least 5 cm off the stem to remove blockages Use post-harvest products such as Chrysal RVB and Chrysal RVB Clear Intensive at the grower...
Energy is the driving force behind water intake, the production of plant hormones and a natural development of the flower. Without energy, the flower will not be able to develop and the flower wilts more quickly than should be the case. Symptoms of a lack of nutrients are: Limited bud and flower development: flowers get ‘stuck’ in the early stage...
Flower petals shrivel up and the buds and leaves drop, which obviously shortens the vase life expectation of cut flowers and the shelf life of potted plants. This is caused by ethylene, the ageing hormone produced in excess by cut flowers such as Dianthus, Delphinium, Agapanthus and in potted plants such as Phalaenopsis and Campanula. Dropping of buds, blooms and...